Focus on COVID-19

COVID-19 and genetic heart disease: a summary of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand guidelines

ABHISHEIK PRASHAR, Belinda Gray

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Abstract

Genetic heart diseases are relatively rare in the population; however, they have very serious, potentially life-threatening consequences. Data to inform best practice for patients with genetic heart disease in light of the current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus pandemic are lacking. Identifying and regularly reviewing areas of consensus among leading specialists is essential for protecting patients who are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality during the pandemic.

Article Extract

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is defined as a death, presumed to be cardiac in origin, in an apparently healthy subject occurring within an hour of the onset of symptoms or unwitnessed deaths where the decedent was well 12 to 24 hours before death.1 SCD has a prevalence of 1.3 cases per 100,000 persons in adults under the age of 35 years in Australia and New Zealand.2 A significant proportion of SCD in the young may be precipitated by underlying genetic heart diseases, encompassing both inherited cardiomyopathies and channelopathies in genes responsible for sodium-, potassium- and calcium-channel function.2

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© VECTORFUSIONART/ STOCK.ADOBE.COM
© VECTORFUSIONART/ STOCK.ADOBE.COM